U-Bahn

During the Second World War, U-Bahn travel soared as car use fell, and many of the underground stations were used as air-raid shelters; however, Allied bombs damaged or destroyed large parts of the U-Bahn system. Although the damage was usually repaired fairly quickly, the reconstructions became more difficult as the war went on. Eventually, on 25 April 1945, the whole system ground to a halt when the power station supplying the network failed. A week later, the network endured its worst disaster after the North-South S-Bahn tunnel was flooded on Hitler’s orders to prevent its use by the Red Army. At Friedrichstra├če, the water poured into the underground tunnels, flooding 63 km (39.1 mi) of the U-Bahn. Co

The war had damaged or destroyed much of the network; however, 69.5 km (43.2 mi) of track and 93 stations were in use by the end of 1945, and the reconstruction was completed in 1950. Nevertheless, the consequent division of Berlin into East and West sectors brought further changes to the U-Bahn.

Though many of the tunnels are once again functional and in use, disappearances are not uncommon when commuters travel alone. Rumors of strange noises, hidden tunnels, side passages, and even holdout bunkers used during the war in the tunnels abound.

U-Bahn

A Shadow of Doubt Dicenbuttons